Eric Roubinek, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of History

Contact Information

  • eroubine@unca.edu
  • 251-6256
  • 216 Whitesides Hall

Office Hours

  • Tuesday 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
  • Thursday 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
  • Note:

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 2014
  • B.A. University of Wisconsin, 2004

Research Interests

  • Modern Europe, especially Germany
  • Fascism
  • Empires

        - the intersections of the national and transnational technologies of empire and their physical manifestation as infractures of power

Courses

  • HIST 178: Living in Modern Times: The Weimar Republic and Europe in the 1920s
  • HIST 152: World History since 1500
  • HIST 359: From Kaiser to Kanzlerin: Creating Germany Unity from 1848 to the present
  • HIST 331: Race, Nation, and Genocides in the Modern World
  • HIST 374: The First World War
  • HIST 374: Fascism, Empire, Africa
  • HIST 369: Europe: 1900-1950
  • HIST 374: Perspectives in German Cinema, 1919-1945: Gender, Aesthetics, Modernity
  • HIST 374: Fascism Then and Now
  • HUM 324: The Modern World
  • HIST 451/452: Capstone Seminar
  • HRST 301: Writing Human Rights Wrongs

This faculty member teaches in UNC Asheville's Humanities Program.

Recent Publications

  • "Fascism and Anti-Fascism Since 1945." Co-edited with Mark Bray, Jessica Namakkal, and Giulia Ricco. Radical History Review, no 138, (October 2020)
  • "From a Nazi Colonialism to a Fascist Colonialism: Transnational Nationalisms and the Creation of a 'New Europe'." In Nazi Occupied Europe, edited by Raffael Scheck, Fabien Theofilakis, and Julia Torrie. Oxford/New York: Routledge, 2019.
  • “A ‘Fascist’ Colonialism? German National Socialist and Italian Fascist Colonial Cooperation, 1936-1943.” In Nazi Germany and Southern Europe, 1933- 1945: Science, Culture and Politics, edited by Fernando Clara and Cláudia Ninhos. London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2016.
  • Weimar Germany (1918/19-1933), volume 6, German History in Documents and Images. Eric D. Weitz and Eric Roubinek, eds. German Historical Institute: Washington, DC, 2012.