Anne Jansen, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English

Contact Information

  • ajansen@unca.edu
  • 828-251-6582
  • 212 Karpen Hall

Office Hours

  • Monday 10:45 am - 11:30 am
  • Tuesday 9:00 am - 9:50 am
  • Note: Via Zoom.

I specialize in contemporary US ethnic literatures, and I also have strong interests in global indigenous literatures and gender and sexuality studies. In my current research, I use a comparative approach to analyze connections across racial lines in contemporary African American, Asian American, Chican@, Latin@, and Native American literatures. I am especially interested in the intersections of politics and aesthetics in 20th and 21st century US ethnic literature in extra-realist forms such as the ghost story, "magical realism," and science fiction.

Born and raised in southern California, I have also experienced life in northern California and Columbus, Ohio. Since coming to UNC Asheville in Fall 2013, I have been absolutely thrilled to teach at a university with such a strong commitment to its students. I find myself consistently amazed by my students' enthusiasm, engagement with the curriculum, and dedication to the community. I am passionate about teaching, whether that means introducing my students to a variety of strategies for producing academic essays and conducting research, or discussing ghosts, monsters, and other extra-realist characters and events in contemporary US ethnic and postcolonial literatures.

When I’m not haunting the halls of Karpen, I’m usually on my bike, doing yoga, or climbing a rock somewhere.

Education

  • Ph.D., The Ohio State University
  • M.A., California State University, Sacramento
  • M.Ed., University of California, Santa Barbara
  • B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara

Publications

  • “Writing Toward Action: Mapping an Affinity Poetics in Craig Santos Perez’s from unincorporated territory.” NAIS: Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, vol. 6, no. 2, 2019. pp. 3-29.
  • “(Dis)Integrating Borders: Crossing Literal/Literary Boundaries in Tropic of Orange and The People of Paper.” Forthcoming from MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States in 2017.
  • “Under Lynching’s Shadow: Grimké’s Call for Domestic Reconfiguration in Rachel.” African American Review, Volume 47, Issue 2-3. Summer/Fall 2014. Pages 391-402.

Teaching

  • ETHN 100:Introduction to US Ethnic Studies
  • LANG 120: Foundations of Academic Writing: Monstrosity in Popular Culture
  • LIT 324: American Literary Tradition
  • LIT 328: Ethnic Literatures: Science Fiction
  • LIT 346: Readings in Gender and Sexuality: Queer of Color Literature and Theory
  • LIT 364: Postcolonial Literature: Literatures of Oceania
  • LIT 364: Postcolonial Literature: Magical Realism and the Postcolonial Novel
  • WGSS 100: Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies